Board index Equipment Film Cameras It's a broad topic and subjective; If you shoot B & W

Film Cameras

It's a broad topic and subjective; If you shoot B & W

prinothcat
 
Posts: 662

It's a broad topic and subjective; If you shoot B & W

Post Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:38 pm


Which film(s) do you like to shoot and why. I recently found a ripping good deal on an F100 which I suspect will be loaded with B&W most of the time. I come from the days of PlusX and TriX. What has come along that really floats your boat and why? Assume that due to time, space and living arrangements, I will not be doing my own darkroom work. I do have an excellent (by reputation at least) custom lab 30 minutes away. Knowing this what further should I be able to tell the lab guys beyond the speed at which the film was shot?

todd_port
 
Posts: 144


Post Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:40 am


I've shot a few rolls of Bergger brf200 (available from b and h photo). Some shots look like they might be from 100 years ago; the result perhaps of coarser grain and the 35mm film size. Anyway when I saw the prints, I was pretty excited.

A write-up on the film is here.

http://shutterbug.com/equipmentreviews/ ... sb_bergger

I shot these with a F100 and brf200 film.

http://www.pbase.com/todd_port/image/90 ... medium.jpg
http://www.pbase.com/todd_port/image/90 ... medium.jpg

Todd

jypsee
 
Posts: 1245

apparently tri-x

Post Fri Jan 04, 2008 5:05 pm


is not the same stuff as when we used it lo those many years ago; I've used it recently in an old Himatic rangefinder and wasn't too thrilled with it.

Lately I've been using Ilford 100 and XP2 (a chromogenic BW film) as well as some PlusX125 and the TMax line. Not thrilled with TMax, but the PlusX is fine.

new film work here
http://www.pbase.com/jypsee/one

old work (the reason I took up film again after scanning these negs) here
http://www.pbase.com/jypsee/protest

rmlupu
 
Posts: 8

Re: It's a broad topic and subjective; If you shoot B &

Post Sun Jan 06, 2008 4:31 pm


prinothcat wrote:Which film(s) do you like to shoot and why. I recently found a ripping good deal on an F100 which I suspect will be loaded with B&W most of the time. I come from the days of PlusX and TriX. What has come along that really floats your boat and why? Assume that due to time, space and living arrangements, I will not be doing my own darkroom work. I do have an excellent (by reputation at least) custom lab 30 minutes away. Knowing this what further should I be able to tell the lab guys beyond the speed at which the film was shot?


Depends on the conditions but for B&W

35mm - Kodak Tri-X & Plus-X – I like Tri-X for low available light and rating higher (1600/3200) and Plus-X when shooting for tone and fine grain in normal lighting conditions.
MF - Ilford Pan F & FP4+ - For medium format I just love Ilford. I feel that I get the best tone and grain with these films.
Sheet - Ilford Delta 100 & FP4+ - Same as above

I do all my own processing so I can control my results better. Developer type and processing method makes for different resluts so the results that make a particular film my favorite might not have the same qualities if lab processed. I recommend getting a few rolls of the top 5 or 6 and run some test shots in different conditions. You can then send them all to the same lab and get a better understanding of what you should expect in the future.

prinothcat
 
Posts: 662

Re: It's a broad topic and subjective; If you shoot B &

Post Sun Jan 06, 2008 8:30 pm


rmlupu wrote:[ You can then send them all to the same lab and get a better understanding of what you should expect in the future.

That was the plan... Then I find that there are a fairly large number of B&W film stocks for 35mm. There are what easily 8 or so flavors of Ilford? So I thought to get some input to help cut down on the trial and error. I should have indicated that I was interested in 35mm stock. Any way so far I've shot out a roll of TriX and part of a Roll of HP5. Same camera, same set up, same conditions, same subject..... You get the idea. Thanks For the input, it's appreciated.

jestev
 
Posts: 398
Location: Dallas, TX


Post Sun Jan 06, 2008 8:51 pm


When I shoot B&W film I almost always shoot Kodak T-Max 100 and sometimes 400. T-Max 100 is my favorite film.

Here are the B&W prints that I've put up here:
http://www.pbase.com/jestev/bw_print_scans
John Stevenson
http://www.pbase.com/jestev
Nikon N70, N6006; D300, D50
Lenses (of 20): Nikkor AF-S 17-55mm f/2.8G ED-IF, Tokina AT-X 12-24 f/4 AF PRO, Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED AF, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D AF, Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/3.5 AI
Canon S1 IS
Minolta XG-7

jypsee
 
Posts: 1245

I've put up some Fomapan 400

Post Thu Jan 10, 2008 3:34 pm


and, from the one roll I've developed so far, I really like it!!

Image

nice contrast when I want it and also some smooth tones if I want that....click the photo above for a better view.

mikoyen
 
Posts: 13
Location: Saint-Joseph-de-Beauce


Post Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:00 am


Hi,
I am using only films. My favorite b&w film is Ilford Pan F 50ASA, it is a smooth film with high contrast like the Kodak Tri X-400. Also the T-Max 400 Professional, Kodak make a new "receipe" for this film. I will try it. If you want to see the difference with b&w film, go on my galery, you will see by yourself.

Guy

nicolasdechamps
 
Posts: 16


Post Sun Jan 20, 2008 11:19 pm


I'm 30 but old fashioned :).. the combination Tri-X + D76 + leica M6 + elmarit 28mm + coolscan 50 + CS2 works fine for me.. I can develop on the bathroom and scan the films at home so I can put the result on pbase just 10 hours after coming back from a trip.. I would like to make some tests with more kind of films, but I guess everybody is happy with is own combination.. and maybe we isntinctively make the right pictures that are more adapted to it?
Regards to all film lovers
Nicolas
http://www.pbase.com/nicolasdechamps


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